Edinburgh Declaration (2004) (excerpts)

EDINBURGH DECLARATION

OF THE

OSCE PARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY

AND

RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED

AT THE THIRTEENTH ANNUAL SESSION

EDINBURGH, 5 TO 9 JULY 2004

CO-OPERATION AND PARTNERSHIP: COPING WITH NEW SECURITY THREATS

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CHAPTER II

ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENT

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The OSCE Parliamentary Assembly:

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41. Calls upon participating States to continue their work on effective concurred strategies, reinforced on a statutory legislative basis, to combat corruption and organized crime, prostitution, economic protectionism in favour of particular countries, money laundering, the financial backing of terrorists, trafficking in human beings, and trafficking in narcotics and weapons;

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CHAPTER III

DEMOCRACY, HUMAN RIGHTS AND HUMANITARIAN QUESTIONS

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58. Emphasizing the central role and responsibility of the national parliaments and parliamentarians to ensure that their legislation meets their obligations concerning the treatment of minorities and their ability to combat trafficking in human beings,

59. Recognizing that since the 1990s, as a result of inter-State and interethnic conflicts and the occupation of a part of one State by another, uncontrolled zones known as “zones of lawlessness” have emerged in certain areas of some countries and are used, among other things, for trafficking in human beings,

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65. Pointing out that NGOs are important for providing care and protection to minority members and to victims of human trafficking,

66. Taking note of the fact that trafficking in human beings is the fastest growing facet of organized international crime involving large financial interests and having its links to corruption in some participating States,

67. Recognizing that children and women are particularly targeted for exploitation by traffickers and would therefore benefit from specialized anti-trafficking programmes,

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The OSCE Parliamentary Assembly:

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77. Emphasizes the need for the harmonization of national legislation of the OSCE participating States and for bringing it into compliance with international norms and standards in such areas as protection of national minorities, trafficking in human beings and gender equality;

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81. Urges all participating States to ensure that their national legislation provides means to effectively fight trafficking in human beings by including adequate penalties for such crimes, protection of victims and facilitating international co-operation as well as providing sufficient resources to law-enforcement and other relevant authorities;

82. Suggests that, as a means of fighting trafficking in human beings, the OSCE participating States provide “hotlines” and other forms of information to potential and actual victims of trafficking in order to inform them about their rights and status, to help them protect themselves against the traffickers and to help them co-operate with the authorities;

83. Encourages the OSCE to take a leading role in the OSCE region in co-ordinating, at the level of headquarters and in the field, all regional efforts to combat human trafficking, in co-operation with the United Nations and other international organizations, so as to ensure a greater level of effectiveness;

84. Encourages all OSCE participating States to co-operate closely, both on a multilateral basis and through relevant international organizations, including NGOs, as well as in their bilateral relations, in efforts to combat trafficking in human beings;

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86. Calls upon all OSCE participating States who have not yet done so to ratify and bring into force the UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime and its Optional Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children; the Convention on the Elimination of All forms of Discrimination Against Women; as well as the Convention on the Rights of the Child with its Optional Protocols on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflicts and the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography;

87. Insists that the participating States create a safer environment for children as well as more economic opportunities for young women in potential countries of origin of trafficking in human beings;

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90. Welcomes the appointment of a Special Representative on Human Trafficking as recommended by the 2003 Rotterdam Declaration of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly and within the mandate given by the 2003 Ministerial Council Meeting in Maastricht;

91. Calls upon the participating States to ensure that the Special Representative on Human Trafficking, in accordance with his or her mandate, should provide accountability for the implementation of the following areas: the integration of a human rights perspective, the establishment and promotion of social and economic rights, de facto gender equality and of a safer environment for children, in addition to the strengthening of the role of civil society through awareness;

92. Appeals to the OSCE participating States to provide the Special Representative on Human Trafficking with sufficient resources, financial and otherwise, to fulfil the mandate, including the resources to carry out research, and to offer their full support and co-operation in his/her work;

93. Reiterates the importance of assisting the OSCE participating States to develop and implement anti-trafficking plans of action, legislation and other means to effectively combat trafficking in human beings as well as to provide relevant training for the OSCE mission members in these matters;

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